simonist:

magicscience:

Tutorial: How to Make Limited Palettes in Adobe Photoshop

An elaboration/extension by the person who made that earlier limited palettes post

…man, idk if i’m phrasing that correctly. just go watch this video, it’s really useful

( 486 ) 1 year ago - Reblog  #color  #technique
tawdryface:

Might prove useful for some people!

tawdryface:

Might prove useful for some people!

simonist:

How I See Color - A Tutorial by *purplekecleon
SO GOOD JEEZ
im gonna shove this entire tutorial into my brain, it’s so so good

simonist:

How I See Color - A Tutorial by *purplekecleon

SO GOOD JEEZ

im gonna shove this entire tutorial into my brain, it’s so so good

( 24 ) 1 year ago - Reblog  #color  #technique

momochanners:

6 Color Scheme Tools

COLORlovers
The biggest resource community for colour palettes as well as patterns. Plus points that they spell “colour”correctly my British way.
Kuler
From Adobe it pretty much works the same way as COLORlovers where you also create your own schemes or edit others accordingly.
Colorotate
This site is a little more interactive and fun with the 3D elements. In addition there are few fun mixing/blending options.
Color Scheme Designer
The Wheel! A great resource for creating schemes as well options for “light-er” or “dark-er” versions.
Pictaculous
There are a few picture-to-colours applications but this is my favourite as, in my opinion, its most accurate. In addition to finding you colours from an image you’ve uploaded, it suggests other similar colour schemes from Colourlovers and Kuler. You can also download swatch files which I find useful.
Color Palette Generator (DeGraeve.com)
If you’re lazy or don’t have the image on your computer, this site lets you use URL’s instead.

I needs them all like burning @_@

(Source: theme-hunter)

belovedlights:

(tutorial)

i just did a cool thing that i think would be useful if you’re like me and sometimes have a hard time picking colours / a colour scheme for an image

basically i just took a brush with moderate spacing, turned on colour dynamics and set all the hue/sat/brightness to a low (~10%-30%) jitter, picked a base colour, and drew a line down the side of the canvas

it’s sort of like when some people save colour swatches so they can keep their shading consistent, but more for playing around with different tones and lighting on a single surface. it’ll probably be pretty good for skin which is very multi-tonal by nature.

a lot of colours came out that i probably wouldn’t have picked manually, but they still looked pretty cool. and it saves a lot of time because now i have a broad range of colours without having to browse through my pantone swatches or open up the colour picker.

Oil Color Palettes

As a painter I often hear mention of colors the masters used in our past. Then when trying to find those palettes I tend to come up short on information. So, now when I do track down that information I have a place for it that I can share with everyone as well. Feel free to send me a color palette of a painter that I have not found or even corrections to the ones I have posted if I’m off in any way.

From this information you can try out some colors you may not have given thought to. And many artists will also tell you they don’t put out every color in their palette for every painting. I’m a huge fan of the limited palette.

inspiring-illustration:

Very interesting video about light and color.

snoipahkat:

OK SO i get asked about colors a lot and i’m really sorry i am so lame at giving detailed answers SO I’M GONNA ATTEMPT TO FORMULATE SOME„,  BASIC TIPS I GUESS
LET ME JUST START OUT BY SAYING i’m not really a very skilled or fancy or formally educated artist (shocking i know) and i don’t take drawing very seriously, BUT I HOPE A FEW THINGS I HAVE SAY WILL HELP YOU

(extra commentary in case anything is hard to read, here is the whole thing in one pic and not an obnoxious photoset)

1. HAVE FUN WHEN YOU ARE COLORING JEEZ don’t loose hair over trying really hard to study and adsorb shading and lighting ‘ruuuules’!! and while enough basic understanding is obviously important and necessary in creating believable and realistic pieces, being creative is also really important as well!! the bottom line of art is that there ARE no rules, and if you really do want to be happy with your work, i find a lot of satisfaction arises in knowing i made something only /I/ could make!! and besides, if i didn’t have fun making art, then i wouldn’t do it, frankly

2. PAY ATTENTION TO WHAT TONE YOUR COLORS PORTRAY this is especially true for people and expressions and setting 

since color is such a big part of a piece, it also plays a big role in setting the tone of your work!! take a minute to evaluate the context of whatever you’re drawing and then try to see what colors would best parrallel that! and especially don’t be afraid to venture into palettes you don’t normally use!! but once you choose a palette that matches the tone of your work BE SURE TO STICK WITH IT so it is contiguous in both the background and foreground

(i used twilight princess and skyward sword as an example, i hope my analysis makes sense)

3. be sure to scribble with and test how colors look together BEFORE you take them to your lines!! and finally HAVE FUN WITH YOUR COLORING i know i already said this but it’s simply tragic when an artist becomes bored/uninterested/frustrated with colors ahhh!!! remember that every artist has different coloring styles so try you best to observe others’ techniques!! pay attention to what you like about them, but ALSO pay attention to what you dislike!!

practice a lot of styles, and ask around which programs/brush settings artists use if you find yourself interested in them!! i’m sorry i can’t help you with more technicalities, but learning for yourself is also half the fun!! plus i’m a lazy motherfucker and i’m bad a tutorials anyway

OKKKKAAY THANKS FOR READING OLLIE OUT

(Source: rakatakat)

San Jose State University Art Syllabus Hub

useful for planning home study lessons along the lines of a formal art degree. lots of quality links and resources to be found.

at the top you’ll see links to "Art 12" "Art 14" and "Art 24". these are the lesson schedules of three full arts courses, with links to online tutorials on CompositionColour and Drawing, respectively.

(Source: forums.somethingawful.com)

rsektion:

goddessofcheese:

astroize:

adriofthedead:

sweetappletea:

ohcararara:

creativeinspiration:

Color Palette Generator
I’m not sure why I just found out about this but….amazing! So fast and simple!

MAGIC.

Instant bookmark.

oh my shit ♥


WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL MY LIFE



SWEET TAPDANCING CHRIST
edit to add:

rsektion:

goddessofcheese:

astroize:

adriofthedead:

sweetappletea:

ohcararara:

creativeinspiration:

Color Palette Generator

I’m not sure why I just found out about this but….amazing! So fast and simple!

MAGIC.

Instant bookmark.

oh my shit ♥

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL MY LIFE

SWEET TAPDANCING CHRIST

edit to add:

rsektion:

pigeonbits:

A handout I made for a coloring workshop I’m teaching tomorrow at CCS.  TEACHING HERE IS SO MUCH FUN ALL THE TIME OMG OMG

stuff i need to remember

rsektion:

pigeonbits:

A handout I made for a coloring workshop I’m teaching tomorrow at CCS.  TEACHING HERE IS SO MUCH FUN ALL THE TIME OMG OMG

stuff i need to remember

CAE’S COLOUR TUTORIAL

chaddiecakes:

LMAO OKAY OKAY SO.

AFTER MUCH DELIBERATION WITH MYSELF (what to include, what not) i’ve finally figured out what to put on my colour tutorial! LSKDJSKLDGJ. i’ve split two parts with multiple subparts! the first part will cover a bunch of rules that you’d PROBS find in a OTHER TUTORIALS/artbooks and are THEREFORE pretty important! i’ll call these the *~*CAE…SICS~*~* b/c they are basics which i (CAE) think are NECESSARY to understand the reasoning in the second part of this tutorial (which will be how i personally stylize/apply/bend/break???? these rules)!

 i’ll call this second part APPLI…CAE..TIONS. 

applicaetions are way heavier on actual colour coordination/palette making (AND I MAKE UP MY OWN TERMS OOOO), as opposed to CAESICS which are AGAIN more based on universal terminology. CAESICS can totally be skipped if you know what I mean by… “hue/saturation/luminosity” and “colour relativity (AKA warmer blue/cooler red).” 

DSFKLDJF DISCLAIMER: I AM BY NO MEANS AN EXPERT AT THIS GAME. and really, the only kind of training i have is… lots and lots and lots of practice??? COUGHS MOVING ON

A. part one: CAESICS

  1. - hue/saturation/luminosity
  2. - colour mixing
  3. - colour wheel (kinda)
  4. - colour warmth/colour coolness
  5. - color relativity

B part two: APPLICAETIONS

  1. - colour “weight”
  2. - general palette tips
  3. - palette breakdown
  4. - shading with colour!
  5. - last thoughts.

Read More

hospitalvespers:

mollywog asked: I’ve been wanting to improve my art and achieve a better grasp on color theory, so I was wondering if you still have/remember that tutorial you made to explain some color theory and if you could maybe post it? ;-; I used to reference it all the time. Or if you know if any great websites that cover it, that would be great!

Sure, here you go! Sorry it’s so… old…

Here are the pictures full size: one two three

hospitalvespers:

something quick for doofusy coz she wanted a tutorial i did but it was from like 2007 and i would die

anyway;
fluorescent lights - fluorescent lights are made so they don’t cast shadows. the light is generally cool, so shadows are soft and almost grayish, and there aren’t many of them. they barely create any cast shadows, so they’re soft light, or form shadows. they’re made specifically for this, since they’re usually used in schools where it’s a pain in the butt to have shadows cast on your hand for writing and other stuff. since the initial shading is soft, anything in the background is even softer; there’s not a lot of contrast going on in a room with flurorescents.

as a note, form shadows are created by light slowly not being able to shine on something. for example, your arm would have a cast shadow on it because it is curved, and light is gradually unable to hit it
cast shadows are created because something is in the way of the light. if you put your hand in front of lamp and made shadow puppets, that would be a cast shadow. 

tungsten/non-fluorescent lights - give off warmer light than fluorescents. they create cast shadows, which is why they’re usually used in life drawing classes. in this picture there’s just one light source, to keep it simple.

non-fluorescent lights have a shorter range than fluorescents, so there are more shadows, and they’re sharper. things like the side of kolya’s face, under his legs, and behind him are all blocked from the light by his body, so the shadows are noticable. in contrast, the shadows in the background are already in the dark, so they continue to be form shadows (as the remaining light from the lamp is not strong enough to reach them)

glowy stuff - in the case of glowy stuff, in this case, a clock radio or something, the type of shadow is generally form. glowy things generally have a limited range that they can reach, so most shadows will be created because the light is no longer able to reach it. it’s more of a case of highlights than anything else!

the most important part of working with different light sources is knowing the difference between cast and form shadows, and how and why they’re created. in all three examples, regardless of whether the shadows are cast or form, places like the side of kolya’s face and under his legs are in shadow. this is because the light cannot reach them, due do them being 3D shape that curve. it helps to remember that the majority of organic shapes are rounded and curved, while a lot of manmade things have sharp, straight edges and faces

(i am sorta braindead rn so i hope this is a bit helpful lol)